USDA Home Loan House Requirements – A Complete List

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USDA Loans: Home Requirements Image of young woman next to a bale

USDA home loan house requirements are common-sense based. The goal is to put a family into a safe and structurally sound house. Here are all the requirements:

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  1. The home is accessible year-round from the street (easy driveway and sidewalk access).
  2. All walls must be in good condition; no mold, holes, rotting parts.
  3. The foundation must be in good condition; no racks, mold or water leaking in.
  4. All doors must be in good condition. That is, not broken, they close properly and locks work, if they have them.
  5. Floors must be good condition; no cracks, no parts missing, no hazards of tripping.
  6. All windows must be in good condition; no cracked or missing panes and they must close and lock properly. Also, no mold, mildew or moisture can be present.
  7. The roof must be in good condition. That means it’s got at least 3 years of life left on it and no missing shingles or holes.
  8. All stairs must be in good condition; they must have a handrail (no missing rails) that is properly installed and no missing / broken steps.
  9. All plumbing systems must be in working order; no leaks and every faucet and drain (and the toilet) must work.
  10. All electrical systems must be in working order; no exposed wiring and everything must work.
  11. No pest damage can be present. Not even the sign of infestation.
USDA Home Loan House Requirements

USDA Home Loan House Requirements And The Next Step

So, good condition does not mean brand new anything, does not mean great. It means safe and working. It is a lot like FHA loans, like common sense says a house people live in should be.

The next thing to do is figure out if you, the borrower, meet USDA’s criteria. Which are, again, simple: put people who with below-below average income for their area into a house that’s safe and sound that they can afford.